Not all watchers are created equal (or how to make yak shaving useful)

Tom Parker wrote “I’ve been hacking around with a Clojurescript project recently, and it resulted in a certain amount of yak shaving when I found the watcher system I was using was eating a lot of CPU. On the one hand, yak shaving is bad, because you’re doing other things that aren’t the core task you’d originally meant…”

By Ed g2s [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC BY-SA 2.5 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], from Wikimedia Commons

How standing on escalators can be faster than walking

Tom Price wrote “The Holborn stand-only escalator trial In 2016, Transport for London (TFL) launched a four month trial preventing commuters from walking up the escalators during peak times outgoing from Holborn underground station on the Central line, where traditionally TFL advises customers to stand on the right and walk on the left. The results showed a throughput increase…”

By total 13 (Leyendo el periódico) [CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Sentiment Analysis of News Articles

Sunghun Jung wrote “What is sentiment analysis? Sentiment analysis, in a nutshell, is used to predict whether a text is negative, neutral, or positive about certain topic without having to read the full text. With the development of various Natural Language Processing (NLP) libraries, sentiment analysis has been an interesting area of exploration. So far, tweets and product…”

How to be a Rockstar developer!

Tom Parker wrote “You’ve probably followed that clickbait of a title and are hoping for some super-secret tips on how to be a ‘Rockstar developer’, and I’m not going to disappoint on that (technically). But before that, I’m going to note to those of you lucky enough to have not seen that particular variety of recruiter spam that…”

PSA: Many ways to manage your Python dependencies

Tom Parker wrote “Having recently learnt about a few more tools, I felt it was worth writing this post. It’s pretty much a PSA, and some of you may well have found most of these, but there are a lot of Python developers out there who haven’t, and the improvements when using some them are considerable, so it’s…”

Solving Zelda Puzzles Satisfactorily

Ceri Storey wrote “In the game Breath of the Wild, there’s a puzzle which in­volves a set of fans and tur­bines in a 4×5 grid, and you must po­s­i­tion the fans in order en­sure all of the tur­bines are spin­ning. Un­for­tu­nately, I’ve never really had much pa­tience for solving this kind of logic puzzle the old fash­ioned way,…”

Padding Oracle Attack or the Virtues of a Glomar response

Rohit Aggarwal wrote “While working on the excellent CryptoPals challenges, I came across the Padding Oracle Attack. The particular version of the attack I was working through, was on CBC mode Decryption when used with AES symmetric key cryptography. The attack has nothing to do with AES and everything to do with this block cipher mode of operation. Various forms of…”

On Mocking Rust

Tom Parker wrote “I’ve recently picked Potboiler back up again with the intention of doing some expansion work on it, but in order to be able to do this sensibly I first had to actually write some tests for it. First time around I was mostly just trying to hack it together and see where I could get, but…”

Acephalic Agile—worse than Waterfall?

Andy Wilson wrote “When we formed LShift, we sat with a group of engineers and asked them what the new company would have to be like for them to want to join it. Their first request was that we get rid of a situation every developer is familiar with—mid-project, the Account Handler or Program Manager turns up to…”

By Image has "Wilse" lettered on it (part of the largely illegible text at lower left). That would be Anders Beer Wilse. Seattle Municipal Archives (Flickr: Construction of Cedar River Pipeline, 1900) [CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Setting up drone.io CI

Patrick Tschorn wrote “Drone.io for go I was recently asked to set up a CI server for one of our go projects and decided to try out drone.io 0.8. From my point of view, the two most attractive features of drone.io are that: the build is defined through a single .drone.yml file in the root directory of the…”