By Pink Sherbet Photography from USA [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Application Patterns for the Outernet

James Uther wrote “I’ve been meandering through the Long Earth series by Terry Pratchett (may Death be as kind to him as he was to Death) and Stephen Baxter (not met Death yet). It’s a classic alternate universe setup, where one (contemporary) day the multiple worlds theory becomes reality and people find they can ‘step’ between alternate universes. Earth…”

Talky Jukebox bot

Tom Parker wrote “Previously I talked about our soon-to-be-new Jukebox (which is currently blocked on going live due to a Mopidy bug). At the bottom of that post, I mentioned Slack support, but hadn’t figured out what sort of form this support would take. The Mopidy search interface is perfectly good, but having something that notifies our #jukebox Slack channel…”

Yet Another Jukebox

Tom Parker wrote “LShift has for a significant part of it’s history (at least 9 years, according to the blog post in 2006 about an earlier version) had an in-office jukebox. When I arrived here to begin with in 2010, there was the aforementioned earlier version, written in Erlang, and I have anecdotal reports of predecessors to that.…”

By J.smith (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Messaging, partition and consistency

David Ireland wrote “‘Why is this so hard?’ is a recurring theme of my RabbitMQ consulting at the moment. If a database gets a split brain, I just ask it to reconcile, and it mostly works. Why can’t RabbitMQ do that? Here is an attempt to explain that in fairly concrete terms. Imagine a simple system where a…”

[[File:Mary Pickford and mirror image cph.3b05765.jpg|thumb|Mary Pickford and mirror image cph.3b05765]]

Teaching Emacs Who You Are

Alexander Kahl wrote “To some people like me, GNU Emacs is more than just the most powerful text editing system in the world. We don’t just write prose and code in Emacs, we read and send our mail from Emacs, we browse the web using Emacs or write better versions of the Vi editor in Emacs. Sometimes however, we…”

By Paul Stein from New Jersey, USA (Crayon Test I) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

bbfy: BBCode in the Age of JavaScript

Alexander Kahl wrote “Some readers might remember BBCode, a dated HTML-like syntax that enables users of forums to apply markup to their posts while minimising the danger of injecting malicious content into the whole website. (note: modern HTML doesn’t use these tags, anymore) While ubiquitous back in the early noughties, it has become a rare sight these days. WYSIWYG editing components…”

By Skrrp (Own work) [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

RabbitMQ throughput: assigning blame

David Ireland wrote “Recently I looked at the instrumentation API to see what I could figure out about allocation performance. Actually, there’s a bunch of information available via erlang:system_info:  (rabbit@mrclumsy)2> erlang:system_info({allocator,binary_alloc}). [{instance,0, [{versions,"0.9","3.0"}, ... It’s far too long to include here, but it at least confirms the allocator is the best fit allocator. Erlang also promises that coalescing…”

Rules-based Network programming with Mio and Rust

Ceri Storey wrote “One thing that you notice after spending most of your time looking at the insides of a program, is that it’s very easy to get bogged down in implementation detail, and end up with rather an optimistic view of how well the world outside of your application works. This is an especially common theme in…”

Raspberry Chef

Tom Parker wrote “Last month I wrote about temperature monitoring, and how I ended up using Raspberry Pi’s. I’m still fiddling around with their configuration, and I ran into a few problems. For starters, if I brought them home, they knew how to talk to the work WiFi, but not my home system, and vice versa (although this is…”

By Szymon (Poczta Polska) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

The end-to-end principle and RabbitMQ queue mirroring

David Ireland wrote “One of the foundations of the internet is the end-to-end principle as described by Saltzer, J. H., D. P. Reed, and D. D. Clark (1981) in End-to-End Arguments in System Design. This pretty much says queue mirroring as a reliability mechanism is a waste of time. You might argue it’s time the RabbitMQ team has spent…”