Panegyric: showing off what we’ve done on Github

Tom Parker wrote “Last month, I said we’d be talking more about open source work that we’re doing. This month, I’ve been building Panegyric, a WordPress plugin (which is what this site is written in). This plugin (which isn’t live on the site yet, but will be soon) lists all the Github pull requests we’ve recently done. However…”

Grant Hollingworth Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Choosing the right scaffold

Ceri Storey wrote “One thing I’ve come to realise as I’ve matured as a developer, is that it turns out I’m merely human. That is somewhat obvious, but you often hear people opine on various discussion boards that their particular tools (that other people feel are error prone) are actually just fine; as long as you remember to…”

© Nevit Dilmen [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

GraphQL is really TreeQL and that’s OK

Ian Rogers wrote “Let’s have a look at GraphQL. It came out of Facebook as a replacement for REST style requests for querying data. It was initially developed from 2012 and made open source in 2015. As Facebook’s main database is the “social graph” it was naturally named GraphQL but, as we’ll see, that’s not a completely accurate…”

Anne Worner Points in the Right Direction (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Making the dockers work

Ceri Storey wrote “Over the past few weeks I’ve been fo­cusing mostly on build and de­ploy­ment tooling around docker and Kuber­netes. One par­tic­ular down­side of the cur­rent sys­tem, is our ap­plic­a­tions have a fair number of ser­vice de­pend­en­cies. Up until now, we’ve taken to run­ning everything in­side docker using dock­er­-­com­pose, but this feels to me more like a way…”

You should be contributing to open source. Yes, all of you!

Tom Parker wrote “In the wake of Hacktoberfest 2017 finishing (and I’ve managed to get the t-shirt again for the 3rd year in a row), I figured I’d try and convince a few more people to give back to open source projects. This is something I do just as part of my day-to-day work, and I want to…”

Supposedly a property test library

Ceri Storey wrote “Over the past few weeks, I’ve been in­spired to create a new prop­erty testing lib­rary for rust, very much in­spired by the work in hy­po­thesis. Why use sup­pos­i­tions over say, quickcheck? For one, this takes in­spir­a­tion from hy­po­thesis and theft. While it’s still in it’s early days, the gen­er­ator system (in­spired by hy­po­thesis’ gen­er­ators means…”

A quick tour of LLVM’s Sanitizer coverage

Ceri Storey wrote “After reading about the new coverage features in hy­po­thesis, I’ve become in­t­erested in how guided fuzzing (as im­ple­mented by Amer­ican Fuzzy Lop or LLVM’s lib­Fuzzer works in­tern­ally with Rust and LLVM. The first step is to un­der­stand how cov­erage works. Clang’s San­it­izer Cov­erage doc­u­ment­a­tion ex­plains the func­tion­ality very well, so I’ll not re­peat too much of that. First of all, I started…”

By cs:ŠJů (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Android Bletchley Password Store

Nick Karandejs wrote “My last project was building an Android password store based on Bletchley and I’m going to describe the process I went through along with some of the issues I had in the process. I started by making Bletchley run on Android… which required a bit of work. First, nothing worked since converter lookup failed for…”

Gasconade: Making blog posts for Twitter users

Tom Parker wrote “Recently there’s been a lot of Twitter posts with the text ‘1/X’ or ‘Thread:’ in them, followed by umpteen other tweets because apparently the relevant poster both refuses to follow the parsimonious limits of the Twitter platform, and for some reason also refuses to write an actual blog post. Given these days the technical act…”

Automagical port allocation for tests

Ceri Storey wrote “It’s quite common to want to test a net­work ser­vice from the out­side, as if it was being ac­cessed from a cli­ent. Quite of­ten, people will pick a “well-­known” port to use, eg: port 8080 or 8888 for a HTTP ser­vice. But that means that if you leave a stray service process lying around, you’ll need to hunt it…”