Bazel: Fast, Correct, Usable – choose two

Tom Parker wrote “I’d recently gotten reminded about Bazel, Google’s ‘boil the ocean‘ build system, and decided to give it a proper go. TL;DR – it’s not ready yet, and might not ever be, unless you’re willing to throw away everything else. I’m generally on the lookout for good build systems. Some of my colleagues are perfectly happy…”

How software systems learn

Ceri Storey wrote “As part of a recent LShift tech meet­ing, we watched the first episode of Stewart Brand’s series How Build­ings Learn, as a way to prompt dis­cus­sion on what it means for soft­ware sys­tems to be ‘liv­able’.”

By Rept0n1x (Own work) [GFDL ( or CC BY-SA 3.0 (], via Wikimedia Commons

5 Whys considered harmful

Ian Rogers wrote “Adverse events happen – a website breaks down, a project doesn’t get delivered on time – and a  proposed technique to find ‘the root cause’ is to ask the “5 Whys”. Attributed to Sakichi Toyoda in the 1930’s and adopted by Toyota and other formal techniques it’s basically the technique of listing a fault and then asking…”

Wharf: Dokku Web frontend

Tom Parker wrote “As long-time readers of my posts may have noticed, most of the apps I talk about building here are deployed to Heroku. This is mainly because I’ve been a long-term user of theirs, and so when they changed their pricing model a couple of years ago, I got grandfathered in a ridiculous number of free hours.…”

Just Enough Design

Ian Rogers wrote “On the one hand it’s become a bit of a cliché to say that Waterfall doesn’t work (in fact ‘waterfall’ may never have existed), but we know that rigid projects don’t deliver—when the level of resources is the only contingency in a project then budget overrun and missed deadlines (or lowered quality) become almost inevitable.…”

A basic recipe for an Elixir SSL server

Patrick Tschorn wrote “In this post, we’ll first try out Erlang’s SSL application interactively and then put together a simple Elixir SSL server OTP application using the Supervisor and GenServer behaviours. Preparation First of all, we’ll create a self-signed certificate: mkdir foo cd foo openssl genrsa -out key.pem 1024 openssl req -new -key key.pem -out request.pem # (using…”

Sked: merged calendars as a service

Tom Parker wrote “I have a little bit of an obsession with calendars, mostly generated ones via a variety of tools. I don’t do well with pen-and-paper for this sort of things, and one of these days I will write the Grand Unified Todo Manager To Rule Them All (which will also eat emails, Calendars and probably a…”

Panegyric: showing off what we’ve done on Github

Tom Parker wrote “Last month, I said we’d be talking more about open source work that we’re doing. This month, I’ve been building Panegyric, a WordPress plugin (which is what this site is written in). This plugin (which isn’t live on the site yet, but will be soon) lists all the Github pull requests we’ve recently done. However…”

Grant Hollingworth Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Choosing the right scaffold

Ceri Storey wrote “One thing I’ve come to realise as I’ve matured as a developer, is that it turns out I’m merely human. That is somewhat obvious, but you often hear people opine on various discussion boards that their particular tools (that other people feel are error prone) are actually just fine; as long as you remember to…”

© Nevit Dilmen [CC BY-SA 3.0 ( or GFDL (], via Wikimedia Commons

GraphQL is really TreeQL and that’s OK

Ian Rogers wrote “Let’s have a look at GraphQL. It came out of Facebook as a replacement for REST style requests for querying data. It was initially developed from 2012 and made open source in 2015. As Facebook’s main database is the “social graph” it was naturally named GraphQL but, as we’ll see, that’s not a completely accurate…”