RabbitMQ on Microsoft Azure

Esther Baruk wrote “With 10,000 new customers each week, Microsoft Azure is one of the major cloud platforms allowing to deploy various services including web applications and virtual machines. RabbitMQ can already be installed on an Amazon EC2 platform or ran as a service on Heroku with Bigwig. In this post, we are going to go through all the steps required…”

By Alf van Beem (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

Source-oriented Exchanges

Alex Thomas wrote “Since the dawn of time in EAI, designers of messaging systems have encouraged an arrangement of queues or topics that is primarily content-oriented. Meanwhile, most real EAI contexts are susceptible to problems arising from different but related messages being processed in the wrong order. A content-oriented topology ignores this and even exacerbates it. Is a practice established over decades actually more of an anti-pattern?”

By Taken by fir0002 | flagstaffotos.com.au Canon 20D + Tamron 28-75mm f/2.8 (Own work) [GFDL 1.2 (http://www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/fdl-1.2.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

Making Celery play nice with RabbitMQ (and Bigwig)

Yong Wen Chua wrote “Celery is a Python library that implements a task queue with scheduling backed by various “brokers”, including RabbitMQ which is used by default. Celery is supposed to be a simple solution to abstract away the details of the brokers backing the task queue, and for many small applications, this works fine. When your application grows…”