Using the BBC micro:bit with PlatformIO

Tom Parker wrote “I recently acquired a micro:bit, the new BBC device intended for helping computer education. After a bit of delay, they’ve finally starting shipping the device, and now members of the public like myself can grab one. So, why this device in the middle of a sea of other options in the modern embedded environment? Well,…”

Waveform Necklace as a Service

Tom Parker wrote “I’m generally quite fond of laser cutters and cute crafting things done with them, so when I saw a Waveform Necklace Instructable the other day, I had to give it a go. Basic idea is that you take a sound recording’s waveform and reduce it’s waveform down to a level where it can be reasonably represented…”

Spark Core-based proxy

Tom Parker wrote “Regular readers of this blog will have seen my earlier post on Dalek remote control where I used a Spark Core to connect the Dalek’s remote control to the internet. However, in the second post I noted how hotel Wi-Fi is basically evil, and so I ran into all manner of problems with connecting the Spark to the Wi-Fi in…”

By Tony Hisgett from Birmingham, UK (Dalek 1) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Telepresence Dalek: Part 2 – Video

Tom Parker wrote “Previously I wrote about the remote control parts of the Telepresence Dalek, but that’s only half the problem. The other half is video, both to provide a view of the Dalek’s PoV for the operator and to display the operator’s face on the Dalek.”

By Tony Hisgett from Birmingham, UK (Dalek 1) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Telepresence Dalek: Part 1 – Remote control

Tom Parker wrote “Earlier this month, I went to a science-fiction convention by the name of Dysprosium. At said convention was a competition called “Dalekdrome”, with the idea of taking remote controlled Daleks and then customising them. When I was first told about this, I was at another convention where someone was attending via a telepresence robot, and so…”

Smart meters

David Ireland wrote “I’ve been using a micro-controller to automatically dim lights according to the time of day and ambient light conditions. At some point, I decided it would be easier to tinker with if I just used a raspberry pi, logged into it, and edited a python program. This doesn’t work: The pi basically can’t do PWM…”