By Nati cz (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

How to actually secure IoT devices

Tom Parker wrote “Every day it feels like there’s some new Internet of Things (IoT) story, telling us how these new devices in our homes and offices are causing more and more havoc. On the other hand, we really like the new and shiny things doing funky things for us, and that doesn’t look like it’s slowing down…”

Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, from Wikipedia

Given When Then

Ian Rogers wrote “There are, of course, a large number of techniques described as being The Way To Do Software Engineering. I’m sure I’ve not come across them all but the ones I know about and use currently include at least: Impact mapping, Pert charts, Gantt charts, Personas, Wardley mapping, Agile, DSDM, MoSCoW, SMART, INVEST and BDD (I’ve…”

Electric railway journal (1914) By Internet Archive Book Images [No restrictions], via Wikimedia Commons

Testing with Traces?

Matthew Sackman wrote “Most APIs and type signatures are hopelessly inadequate for capturing and describing a model. For example, consider a map and the signatures for put and get. Even if you have pure functional type signatures, the signatures on their own convey no information about what they do with a key and value during put. For this…”

Thanks to zmescience.com for photo

Programming is not a Performance

Ian Rogers wrote “Programming is more like writing a novel then executing a performance. No I don’t mean the likes of If Hemingway Wrote JavaScript  – I mean, apart from ridiculous job interviews involving a whiteboard and pen  (NB. LShift never does that) coding is very unlikely to be a performance in an instant of time. Usually when…”

Why bother testing?

Ian Rogers wrote “It’d be nice to be able to make a definitive case for the benefits of software tests, but I can’t due to this one question: Is it possible to prove the correctness of a program using tests? The answer is unfortunately “no of course not” and I’ll show why below. But all is not lost…”