Old spring-cover clock with chain

A memory gotcha

Matthew Sackman wrote “A couple of weeks ago I was reading Juho Snellman’s blog on implementing a hierarchical timer wheel, and as usual, over on the morning paper, Adrian’s covered a paper on various approaches to timer structures. What I found most interesting though is the final graph on Juho’s blog post where he does some performance testing…”

Using the BBC micro:bit with PlatformIO

Tom Parker-Shemilt wrote “I recently acquired a micro:bit, the new BBC device intended for helping computer education. After a bit of delay, they’ve finally starting shipping the device, and now members of the public like myself can grab one. So, why this device in the middle of a sea of other options in the modern embedded environment? Well,…”

By Mboldfield at English Wikipedia [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Call stack complexity

Matthew Sackman wrote “Over on the morning paper, Adrian’s recently covered a number of papers looking at trying to detect bugs in code using slightly unusual means (i.e. not the usual combination of lots of buggy tests and lots of static checks). So that’s been on my mind lately, at least when it gets a chance in between…”

By Engineers11 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Scripting vs. Engineering

Ian Rogers wrote “I’ve come to the conclusion that the terms like “programming”, “coding” etc. have become horribly ambiguous which has enabled: organisations to offer courses on html/css editing as “coding” people to make claims like “nodejs is more productive than java” (which is a nonsense statement either way) various arguments along the lines of “is X a…”

By Maksym Kozlenko (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

It’s all happened before

Ceri Storey wrote “It’s all happened before Coming from an operations background, I’ve found that one of the best ways to understand a system’s behaviour is to trace the messages between components. Now, most languages go have a log library, that will at minimum, allow developers to log when an event occurred with a description. However, if we…”

By Nevinson, C R W [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Pushing Back

Matthew Sackman wrote “Over the last year I’ve become more and more convinced that possibly the most important feature of any queuing system is the ability to take action immediately upon enqueuing of a new item, where the action can modify the queue, and is based on state of the queue itself. Most commonly, this is referred to…”

By Mr. Granger (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

First impressions of Idris

Ashley Hewson wrote “Lately I’ve invested some time learning Idris. I wanted to share some thoughts on being a beginner at Idris, in no particular order. My experience has been positive overall, so if you’ve been tempted to try it out, I hope this will encourage you to go ahead. I’m not going to discuss my motivation for…”

By Btcpg (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Practising Software Engineering

Matthew Sackman wrote “A tourist stops a musician on the streets of New York. “Excuse me, can you tell me how to get to Carnegie Hall?” “Of course”, answers the musician, “Practise, practise, practise!” In the book ‘Outliers: The Story of Success’, the author Malcolm Gladwell repeatedly mentions the “10,000-Hour Rule”, claiming that the key to achieving world…”

[[File:Mary Pickford and mirror image cph.3b05765.jpg|thumb|Mary Pickford and mirror image cph.3b05765]]

Teaching Emacs Who You Are

Alexander Kahl wrote “To some people like me, GNU Emacs is more than just the most powerful text editing system in the world. We don’t just write prose and code in Emacs, we read and send our mail from Emacs, we browse the web using Emacs or write better versions of the Vi editor in Emacs. Sometimes however, we…”

By Paul Stein from New Jersey, USA (Crayon Test I) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

bbfy: BBCode in the Age of JavaScript

Alexander Kahl wrote “Some readers might remember BBCode, a dated HTML-like syntax that enables users of forums to apply markup to their posts while minimising the danger of injecting malicious content into the whole website. (note: modern HTML doesn’t use these tags, anymore) While ubiquitous back in the early noughties, it has become a rare sight these days. WYSIWYG editing components…”

By Wjablow (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

The life-changing magic of refactoring

James Uther wrote “I’m really a unix guy, but I have to admit, the whole .NET/SQLserver stack is hugely empowering. An average employee can take it, and with next to no knowledge or experience, but with a lot of determination and time, can write enough code to underpin an entire company. You start with a windows form, place…”

In defence of Integration tests

Ian Rogers wrote “There's a notion that 'Integration tests are somehow rubbish and we should replace them with contract tests' that I wish to reject.”