By Nati cz (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

How to actually secure IoT devices

Tom Parker wrote “Every day it feels like there’s some new Internet of Things (IoT) story, telling us how these new devices in our homes and offices are causing more and more havoc. On the other hand, we really like the new and shiny things doing funky things for us, and that doesn’t look like it’s slowing down…”

By Mboldfield at English Wikipedia [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Call stack complexity

Matthew Sackman wrote “Over on the morning paper, Adrian’s recently covered a number of papers looking at trying to detect bugs in code using slightly unusual means (i.e. not the usual combination of lots of buggy tests and lots of static checks). So that’s been on my mind lately, at least when it gets a chance in between…”

By Ixocactus (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

ECMAScript 6

Jarek Siembida wrote “Recent projects got me dealing with JavaScript and this got me thinking about the language. You know, The Bad Parts. The damage has been done and there is no simple way to backpedal out of it. But hey, there is ECMAScript 6 to our rescue, is there not? Its final shape and form is known…”

Pyrexia: IoT office temperature monitoring

Tom Parker wrote “Most of the projects I write about here are pretty much complete, or at least good enough. This one is a little bit more of a work in progress for reasons that will become clear fairly soon… One of the ongoing conversations in LShift over the years has been regarding the temperature in the office. It…”

By Wjablow (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

The life-changing magic of refactoring

James Uther wrote “I’m really a unix guy, but I have to admit, the whole .NET/SQLserver stack is hugely empowering. An average employee can take it, and with next to no knowledge or experience, but with a lot of determination and time, can write enough code to underpin an entire company. You start with a windows form, place…”

On being almost there

James Uther wrote “Personis is an ongoing line of research projects about how we can store personal data (thing location tracking, fitness trackers, etc) in a way that leaves us in control of our data but at the same time allows us to give permission to useful services to process that data for us. A canonical example would…”

By Barry haynes (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Proposal: The Borges Programming Language

Tim Band wrote “Cliff L. Biffle’s esoteric programming language HQ9+ is a poke in the eye to programming challenges, but a poke only with a damp rag. As we should be able to do better, I propose the Borges programming language. It is inspired by Jorge Luis Borges’ story “Funes The Memorious”, which concerns a man, Funes, who…”

By Gringer (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Tumblr blog generator

Tom Parker wrote “TL;DR version – OAuth sucks, Tumblr’s API has some notable faults. So, a while back I came across the “dice shaming” meme. For those of you who haven’t seen this before, or who aren’t RPG players and so don’t know what’s going on, it’s a bunch of posts of people going “I rolled my dice…”

By English: Cpl. Lydia M. Davey [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Playing with Open NHS data, and a rant

James Uther wrote “Open Data ™ is being pushed quite heavily by the powers that be, which is mostly a good thing because It’s useful information that I want to use, and I’ve already paid taxes for it. Also, this is a democracy dammit. Can Haz Sunlight!. The NHS is part of this. For most of this post…”

Android app security

David Ireland wrote “Reading Japanese govt: Use operator-run app stores, not Google Play reminded me of an app that I use a lot, but who’s permissions are a cause for concern: Ocado on the Go. The Ocado app wants to use your phone’s video camera, so it can scan bar codes. This is a legitimate requirement: there’s no way…”