A simple Knockout page router

Sam Carr wrote “Knockout.js is a pleasantly simple approach to data-binding ViewModels into your HTML. Like many JavaScript libraries it sticks to a core mission with a few simple concepts, which makes it quite approachable. Its simple template support means that you don’t need to write much code to get a top-level page router going in your single…”

By Alberto-g-rovi (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

When in Rome

David Ireland wrote “I’ve been trying to integrate js-sequence-diagrams into Trac. I’ve reached the point where I can choose between my sequence diagrams getting rendered, and the rest of the Javascript in Trac working. And it’s all because of an underscore… There’s a popular library in the Javascript world: underscore. In python _ is used to internationalize a…”

Getting back into front-end web development

Sam Carr wrote “I’ve been working on a small SPA (Single Page Application) – just HTML, CSS and JavaScript statically served and doing its thing entirely in the browser. I learned a great deal throughout the project, but here are some of the things that strike me as most valuable. Get a good workflow going I used Grunt…”

Two Magnolias, one container

Tim Band wrote “We are using Magnolia in a number of projects here at LShift. I have been feeling that Magnolia has a simple way to do most things, but often there are a number of other plausible alternatives that gradually lead you into wasting enormous amounts of time. Here I want to present a simple way to…”

Predicting and controlling correlations in differentials of addition mod 2^{n}

Paul Crowley wrote “This is a paper I wrote in collaboration with Scott Fluhrer in 2005. It was not accepted for FSE 2006; it would have been better if I hadn’t waited until 2014 to make it public, but better late than never. It arose from a discovery I made when developing attacks on Salsa20 for “Truncated differential…”

A study in Scala

Sam Carr wrote “Cards on the table: I like Scala. Right now it’s my go-to general purpose programming language, but I know that many people have a dim opinion of it, or appreciate its positives but are heavily conflicted by its negatives. Actually I do put myself in that latter camp, though I think I’ve got deep enough…”

Grunt uglify file specs

Sam Carr wrote “I struggled a bit finding relevant examples of Gruntfile configuration for Uglify, so having solved a few specific problems myself, here’s what I came up with. This is just a snippet from the whole Gruntfile of course, and contains half-decent comments already, though I’ll provide some extra explanations below to point out the most interesting…”

Getting Sieves Right

James Uther wrote “The great thing about being wrong is that you get to learn something. In a previous post I went on at length about the the sieve of eratosthenes. Now that I have been enlightened by Melissa O'Neill I must make corrections.”

By Shamsuddin Muhammad from Fort Hood, TX, USA (Jack Swagger) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Documenting an HTTP API with Swagger

Sam Carr wrote “I recently tried out Swagger, for documenting an HTTP API. The big win with Swagger is that it provides a sweet HTML UI to browse your API docs and experiment with sending requests and viewing responses, which is a great experience for other developers that are trying to get to grips with your API. Try…”

By StromBer (Own work) [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Optimizing loops in C for higher numerical throughput and for fun

Jarek Siembida wrote “We had here, in LShift, this typical C-vs-Fortran discussion which prompted me to follow up on it. In this holy war I stand by C and believe that a lot of opinions supporting the alleged superiority of Fortran in numerical throughput come from poor understanding of what actually can be done on the C side.…”

Small shouldn’t mean primitive

David Ireland wrote “The internet of things seems to be coming any day now, but the state of embedded development seems to be deplorable. Almost everything is written in C or C++. Device drivers are written over and over, once for each RTOS, or worse. When high level languages are available, they seem to be implemented directly on…”

Tell don’t ask with Sinatra handlers

Ceri Storey wrote “In Bigwig, in order to keep our code neat and well factored, we’ve tried to adhere to the principle of tell, don’t ask as much as we can. However, one place this can be difficult is within a handler for an HTTP request (we’re using Sinatra for that).”