Supposedly a property test library

Ceri Storey wrote “Over the past few weeks, I’ve been in­spired to create a new prop­erty testing lib­rary for rust, very much in­spired by the work in hy­po­thesis. Why use sup­pos­i­tions over say, quickcheck? For one, this takes in­spir­a­tion from hy­po­thesis and theft. While it’s still in it’s early days, the gen­er­ator system (in­spired by hy­po­thesis’ gen­er­ators means…”

A quick tour of LLVM’s Sanitizer coverage

Ceri Storey wrote “After reading about the new coverage features in hy­po­thesis, I’ve become in­t­erested in how guided fuzzing (as im­ple­mented by Amer­ican Fuzzy Lop or LLVM’s lib­Fuzzer works in­tern­ally with Rust and LLVM. The first step is to un­der­stand how cov­erage works. Clang’s San­it­izer Cov­erage doc­u­ment­a­tion ex­plains the func­tion­ality very well, so I’ll not re­peat too much of that. First of all, I started…”

Extending Splitwise’s currency conversion

Tom Parker wrote “I’m rather fond of Splitwise, which is an app/website for recording money owed between multiple people. Myself and my partner use it a lot for various expenses, and it’s really useful when you’ve got many different payments, and you need to keep track over time. We’ve got one repeated payment however that’s been in US…”

Cross-grading for fun and profit

Tom Parker wrote “First thing you’re probably wondering: What’s cross-grading? Well, it’s a bit like upgrading, except more sidewise than definitely upwards. It involves the changing of the architecture of a system, most typically from 32-bit to 64-bit, and most typically from x86 to x86-64 (although similar options are apparently doable for other architecture families, including ARM, MIPS and…”

Potboiler

Tom Parker wrote “Over the last couple of years I’ve been reading and talking about a lot of things related to distributed systems. This is a common train of thought around here, and after working on this on and off for the past 18 months or so (the version you’re seeing here is in fact version 3 having repeatedly changed…”

Using the BBC micro:bit with PlatformIO

Tom Parker wrote “I recently acquired a micro:bit, the new BBC device intended for helping computer education. After a bit of delay, they’ve finally starting shipping the device, and now members of the public like myself can grab one. So, why this device in the middle of a sea of other options in the modern embedded environment? Well,…”

Scrutiny: Github permissions audit and backup tool

Tom Parker wrote “These days we’ve all got an awful lot of our code in Github, and so we really need both a backup (so we can cope with them having a catastrophic failure) and a permissions auditing mechanism (so we know who’s getting access). For the latter, some of you may be saying “just use the audit…”

Yet Another Jukebox

Tom Parker wrote “LShift has for a significant part of it’s history (at least 9 years, according to the blog post in 2006 about an earlier version) had an in-office jukebox. When I arrived here to begin with in 2010, there was the aforementioned earlier version, written in Erlang, and I have anecdotal reports of predecessors to that.…”

By Paul Stein from New Jersey, USA (Crayon Test I) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

bbfy: BBCode in the Age of JavaScript

Alexander Kahl wrote “Some readers might remember BBCode, a dated HTML-like syntax that enables users of forums to apply markup to their posts while minimising the danger of injecting malicious content into the whole website. (note: modern HTML doesn’t use these tags, anymore) While ubiquitous back in the early noughties, it has become a rare sight these days. WYSIWYG editing components…”

Raspberry Chef

Tom Parker wrote “Last month I wrote about temperature monitoring, and how I ended up using Raspberry Pi’s. I’m still fiddling around with their configuration, and I ran into a few problems. For starters, if I brought them home, they knew how to talk to the work WiFi, but not my home system, and vice versa (although this is…”