Cross-grading for fun and profit

Tom Parker wrote “First thing you’re probably wondering: What’s cross-grading? Well, it’s a bit like upgrading, except more sidewise than definitely upwards. It involves the changing of the architecture of a system, most typically from 32-bit to 64-bit, and most typically from x86 to x86-64 (although similar options are apparently doable for other architecture families, including ARM, MIPS and…”

Potboiler

Tom Parker wrote “Over the last couple of years I’ve been reading and talking about a lot of things related to distributed systems. This is a common train of thought around here, and after working on this on and off for the past 18 months or so (the version you’re seeing here is in fact version 3 having repeatedly changed…”

Using the BBC micro:bit with PlatformIO

Tom Parker wrote “I recently acquired a micro:bit, the new BBC device intended for helping computer education. After a bit of delay, they’ve finally starting shipping the device, and now members of the public like myself can grab one. So, why this device in the middle of a sea of other options in the modern embedded environment? Well,…”

Scrutiny: Github permissions audit and backup tool

Tom Parker wrote “These days we’ve all got an awful lot of our code in Github, and so we really need both a backup (so we can cope with them having a catastrophic failure) and a permissions auditing mechanism (so we know who’s getting access). For the latter, some of you may be saying “just use the audit…”

Yet Another Jukebox

Tom Parker wrote “LShift has for a significant part of it’s history (at least 9 years, according to the blog post in 2006 about an earlier version) had an in-office jukebox. When I arrived here to begin with in 2010, there was the aforementioned earlier version, written in Erlang, and I have anecdotal reports of predecessors to that.…”

By Paul Stein from New Jersey, USA (Crayon Test I) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

bbfy: BBCode in the Age of JavaScript

Alexander Kahl wrote “Some readers might remember BBCode, a dated HTML-like syntax that enables users of forums to apply markup to their posts while minimising the danger of injecting malicious content into the whole website. (note: modern HTML doesn’t use these tags, anymore) While ubiquitous back in the early noughties, it has become a rare sight these days. WYSIWYG editing components…”

Raspberry Chef

Tom Parker wrote “Last month I wrote about temperature monitoring, and how I ended up using Raspberry Pi’s. I’m still fiddling around with their configuration, and I ran into a few problems. For starters, if I brought them home, they knew how to talk to the work WiFi, but not my home system, and vice versa (although this is…”

In defence of Integration tests

Ian Rogers wrote “There's a notion that 'Integration tests are somehow rubbish and we should replace them with contract tests' that I wish to reject.”

Waveform Necklace as a Service

Tom Parker wrote “I’m generally quite fond of laser cutters and cute crafting things done with them, so when I saw a Waveform Necklace Instructable the other day, I had to give it a go. Basic idea is that you take a sound recording’s waveform and reduce it’s waveform down to a level where it can be reasonably represented…”

Coney: RabbitMQ config tool

Tom Parker wrote “A while back, I was playing around with a series of tools to test RabbitMQ in various related configurations. Now, one thing that these tools had in common, was that the users they were running as only had enough permissions to publish or consume messages, but not to configure the queues/exchange/bindings. This isn’t a common…”