Extending Splitwise’s currency conversion

Tom Parker-Shemilt wrote “I’m rather fond of Splitwise, which is an app/website for recording money owed between multiple people. Myself and my partner use it a lot for various expenses, and it’s really useful when you’ve got many different payments, and you need to keep track over time. We’ve got one repeated payment however that’s been in US…”

Cross-grading for fun and profit

Tom Parker-Shemilt wrote “First thing you’re probably wondering: What’s cross-grading? Well, it’s a bit like upgrading, except more sidewise than definitely upwards. It involves the changing of the architecture of a system, most typically from 32-bit to 64-bit, and most typically from x86 to x86-64 (although similar options are apparently doable for other architecture families, including ARM, MIPS and…”

Potboiler

Tom Parker-Shemilt wrote “Over the last couple of years I’ve been reading and talking about a lot of things related to distributed systems. This is a common train of thought around here, and after working on this on and off for the past 18 months or so (the version you’re seeing here is in fact version 3 having repeatedly changed…”

Using the BBC micro:bit with PlatformIO

Tom Parker-Shemilt wrote “I recently acquired a micro:bit, the new BBC device intended for helping computer education. After a bit of delay, they’ve finally starting shipping the device, and now members of the public like myself can grab one. So, why this device in the middle of a sea of other options in the modern embedded environment? Well,…”

Scrutiny: Github permissions audit and backup tool

Tom Parker-Shemilt wrote “These days we’ve all got an awful lot of our code in Github, and so we really need both a backup (so we can cope with them having a catastrophic failure) and a permissions auditing mechanism (so we know who’s getting access). For the latter, some of you may be saying “just use the audit…”

Yet Another Jukebox

Tom Parker-Shemilt wrote “LShift has for a significant part of it’s history (at least 9 years, according to the blog post in 2006 about an earlier version) had an in-office jukebox. When I arrived here to begin with in 2010, there was the aforementioned earlier version, written in Erlang, and I have anecdotal reports of predecessors to that.…”

By Paul Stein from New Jersey, USA (Crayon Test I) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

bbfy: BBCode in the Age of JavaScript

Alexander Kahl wrote “Some readers might remember BBCode, a dated HTML-like syntax that enables users of forums to apply markup to their posts while minimising the danger of injecting malicious content into the whole website. (note: modern HTML doesn’t use these tags, anymore) While ubiquitous back in the early noughties, it has become a rare sight these days. WYSIWYG editing components…”

Raspberry Chef

Tom Parker-Shemilt wrote “Last month I wrote about temperature monitoring, and how I ended up using Raspberry Pi’s. I’m still fiddling around with their configuration, and I ran into a few problems. For starters, if I brought them home, they knew how to talk to the work WiFi, but not my home system, and vice versa (although this is…”

In defence of Integration tests

Ian Rogers wrote “There's a notion that 'Integration tests are somehow rubbish and we should replace them with contract tests' that I wish to reject.”

Waveform Necklace as a Service

Tom Parker-Shemilt wrote “I’m generally quite fond of laser cutters and cute crafting things done with them, so when I saw a Waveform Necklace Instructable the other day, I had to give it a go. Basic idea is that you take a sound recording’s waveform and reduce it’s waveform down to a level where it can be reasonably represented…”

Coney: RabbitMQ config tool

Tom Parker-Shemilt wrote “A while back, I was playing around with a series of tools to test RabbitMQ in various related configurations. Now, one thing that these tools had in common, was that the users they were running as only had enough permissions to publish or consume messages, but not to configure the queues/exchange/bindings. This isn’t a common…”

By Prashant Shrestha from Kathmandu, Nepal (branches Uploaded by russavia) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Everything you ever wanted to know about git submodules and more

Ashley Hewson wrote “I regularly hear complaints that git submodules are difficult to work with. If you search for ‘git submodules’, then (depending on your filter bubble) you’ll probably get several blog articles warning you not to use them. I agree that the UI is not at all intuitive,1 but like most things in git, submodules are quite…”

Getting back into front-end web development

Sam Carr wrote “I’ve been working on a small SPA (Single Page Application) – just HTML, CSS and JavaScript statically served and doing its thing entirely in the browser. I learned a great deal throughout the project, but here are some of the things that strike me as most valuable. Get a good workflow going I used Grunt…”

Grunt uglify file specs

Sam Carr wrote “I struggled a bit finding relevant examples of Gruntfile configuration for Uglify, so having solved a few specific problems myself, here’s what I came up with. This is just a snippet from the whole Gruntfile of course, and contains half-decent comments already, though I’ll provide some extra explanations below to point out the most interesting…”

By Shamsuddin Muhammad from Fort Hood, TX, USA (Jack Swagger) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Documenting an HTTP API with Swagger

Sam Carr wrote “I recently tried out Swagger, for documenting an HTTP API. The big win with Swagger is that it provides a sweet HTML UI to browse your API docs and experiment with sending requests and viewing responses, which is a great experience for other developers that are trying to get to grips with your API. Try…”

Managing multiple GitHub repositories

Frank Shearar wrote “We all know GitHub is a fantastic way to collaborate on software. It has a fairly basic issue tracker, but it serves most purposes well enough. But if your code base is spread across several repositories, it can be difficult to know how you’re doing, from a management perspective. Octoherder can help with that.”