Waveform Necklace as a Service

Tom Parker-Shemilt wrote “I’m generally quite fond of laser cutters and cute crafting things done with them, so when I saw a Waveform Necklace Instructable the other day, I had to give it a go. Basic idea is that you take a sound recording’s waveform and reduce it’s waveform down to a level where it can be reasonably represented…”

Coney: RabbitMQ config tool

Tom Parker-Shemilt wrote “A while back, I was playing around with a series of tools to test RabbitMQ in various related configurations. Now, one thing that these tools had in common, was that the users they were running as only had enough permissions to publish or consume messages, but not to configure the queues/exchange/bindings. This isn’t a common…”

By Prashant Shrestha from Kathmandu, Nepal (branches Uploaded by russavia) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Everything you ever wanted to know about git submodules and more

Ashley Hewson wrote “I regularly hear complaints that git submodules are difficult to work with. If you search for ‘git submodules’, then (depending on your filter bubble) you’ll probably get several blog articles warning you not to use them. I agree that the UI is not at all intuitive,1 but like most things in git, submodules are quite…”

Getting back into front-end web development

Sam Carr wrote “I’ve been working on a small SPA (Single Page Application) – just HTML, CSS and JavaScript statically served and doing its thing entirely in the browser. I learned a great deal throughout the project, but here are some of the things that strike me as most valuable. Get a good workflow going I used Grunt…”

Grunt uglify file specs

Sam Carr wrote “I struggled a bit finding relevant examples of Gruntfile configuration for Uglify, so having solved a few specific problems myself, here’s what I came up with. This is just a snippet from the whole Gruntfile of course, and contains half-decent comments already, though I’ll provide some extra explanations below to point out the most interesting…”

By Shamsuddin Muhammad from Fort Hood, TX, USA (Jack Swagger) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Documenting an HTTP API with Swagger

Sam Carr wrote “I recently tried out Swagger, for documenting an HTTP API. The big win with Swagger is that it provides a sweet HTML UI to browse your API docs and experiment with sending requests and viewing responses, which is a great experience for other developers that are trying to get to grips with your API. Try…”

Managing multiple GitHub repositories

Frank Shearar wrote “We all know GitHub is a fantastic way to collaborate on software. It has a fairly basic issue tracker, but it serves most purposes well enough. But if your code base is spread across several repositories, it can be difficult to know how you’re doing, from a management perspective. Octoherder can help with that.”

Comments are important

Frank Shearar wrote “Nat Pryce wrote a fun little library the other day called code-words. It rips your source into words, and turns the words into a wordcloud. In short, a visual representation of the most common words in your source, and using font size to indicate the more common terms. The aim is to give an introduction…”

Three approaches to ambiguous grammars

Frank Shearar wrote “We have many tools in our parsing toolbox. Today let’s look at how three different parsing techniques handle ambiguity caused by choice.”

Just In Time Development

Frank Shearar wrote “Since the dark ages of yesteryear Squeak has had a very interesting button in its Debugger – “create”. Today we’re going to teach it a new trick.”

cloverage – a code coverage tool for clojure

Jacek Lach wrote “A couple years ago we presented a couple design sketches for a code coverage tool for clojure. More recently we spent some time researching whether existing code coverage tools would suffice for our requirements, and after finding out that java based code coverage tools either don’t work at all, or produce unhelpful output, we decided…”

Using GitHub for planning

Frank Shearar wrote “An important part of delivering software is knowing how long it will take to deliver some piece of functionality. Today we will see a small GitHub hack to help control estimation. It’s all very well knowing the parts we need to implement some system. We need to know how long it will take to build.…”