Scrutiny: Github permissions audit and backup tool

Tom Parker wrote “These days we’ve all got an awful lot of our code in Github, and so we really need both a backup (so we can cope with them having a catastrophic failure) and a permissions auditing mechanism (so we know who’s getting access). For the latter, some of you may be saying “just use the audit…”

Raspberry Chef

Tom Parker wrote “Last month I wrote about temperature monitoring, and how I ended up using Raspberry Pi’s. I’m still fiddling around with their configuration, and I ran into a few problems. For starters, if I brought them home, they knew how to talk to the work WiFi, but not my home system, and vice versa (although this is…”

By Prashant Shrestha from Kathmandu, Nepal (branches Uploaded by russavia) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Everything you ever wanted to know about git submodules and more

Ashley Hewson wrote “I regularly hear complaints that git submodules are difficult to work with. If you search for ‘git submodules’, then (depending on your filter bubble) you’ll probably get several blog articles warning you not to use them. I agree that the UI is not at all intuitive,1 but like most things in git, submodules are quite…”

Enhancing peer review through GitHub

Frank Shearar wrote “You love GitHub. Of course you do. You love peer review. You especially love sending a pull request back asking for nits to be picked. So when your submitter claims to have addressed your concerns, how do you check? You could walk the commits. You could diff the entire pull request against master. If only…”

Continuous Integration for Github Pull Requests with Teamcity

Ceri Storey wrote “Most developers with an interest in open source software these days have seen the Github interface for handling pull requests, and relatedly, Travis CI’s support for pull requests. And so we thought it’d be useful to have something similar for our internal CI system.”

mercurial-server 0.8 released

Paul Crowley wrote “mercurial-server home page mercurial-server gives your developers remote read/write access to centralized Mercurial repositories using SSH public key authentication; it provides convenient and fine-grained key management and access control.”

Mix and match version control

David Ireland wrote “LShift’s standard version control platform these days is Mercurial, but just before we adopted it, I started a project using Trac and Subversion, mostly because that’s what Trac does out of the box. Later, we branched the project to add a large new project, and during that branch we converted from using ant to Maven…”

Smalltalk vs. Javascript; Diff and Diff3 for Squeak Smalltalk

Tony Garnock-Jones wrote “Many of my recent posts here have discussed the diff and diff3 code I wrote in Javascript. A couple of weekends ago I sat down and translated the code into Squeak Smalltalk. The experience of writing the “same code” for the two different environments let me compare them fairly directly. To sum up, Smalltalk was…”

Adding distributed version control to TiddlyWiki

Tony Garnock-Jones wrote “After my talk on Javascript DVCS at the Osmosoft Open Source Show’n’tell, I went to visit Osmosoft, the developers of TiddlyWiki, to talk about giving TiddlyWiki some DVCS-like abilities. Martin Budden and I sat down and built a couple of prototypes: one where each tiddler is versioned every time it is edited, and one where…”

Mercurial merge technique

Tony Garnock-Jones wrote “We’re using Mercurial here at LShift for much of our development work, now, and we’re finding it a great tool. We make heavy use of branches (“branch per bug”) for many projects, and this is also a pretty smooth experience. One issue that has come up is policy regarding merging the trunk (“default”) into any…”