Why bother testing?

Ian Rogers wrote “It’d be nice to be able to make a definitive case for the benefits of software tests, but I can’t due to this one question: Is it possible to prove the correctness of a program using tests? The answer is unfortunately “no of course not” and I’ll show why below. But all is not lost…”

By Btcpg (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Practising Software Engineering

Matthew Sackman wrote “A tourist stops a musician on the streets of New York. “Excuse me, can you tell me how to get to Carnegie Hall?” “Of course”, answers the musician, “Practise, practise, practise!” In the book ‘Outliers: The Story of Success’, the author Malcolm Gladwell repeatedly mentions the “10,000-Hour Rule”, claiming that the key to achieving world…”

By Pink Sherbet Photography from USA [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Application Patterns for the Outernet

James Uther wrote “I’ve been meandering through the Long Earth series by Terry Pratchett (may Death be as kind to him as he was to Death) and Stephen Baxter (not met Death yet). It’s a classic alternate universe setup, where one (contemporary) day the multiple worlds theory becomes reality and people find they can ‘step’ between alternate universes. Earth…”

In defence of Integration tests

Ian Rogers wrote “There's a notion that 'Integration tests are somehow rubbish and we should replace them with contract tests' that I wish to reject.”

By mark sebastian (Flickr: Macro (#50542)) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Building a ReactiveUi

Yong Wen Chua wrote “I’d be one of the first few to admit that I am horrible at making UIs. My rather positive experience with working with Knockout made me wonder one day if there was an equivalent in the .NET world where I could piece together a quick application with an actual UI, while wiring up the display…”

By Mariofan13 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Lunchtime hack: Let’s run Science!

James Uther wrote “Possibly part 1. Who else likes visiting science museums? All those old apparatus – bits of the radio telescope that first saw pulsars, longitude prize clocks, jury-rigged ingenious devices that captured the first glimpse of something new and exciting. One day the LHC will be dismantled, carved up and shipped to museums around the world.…”

By Kiran Foster from no fixed abode, New Zealand (doughnut) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Gemalto

David Ireland wrote “It’s claimed GCHQ were able to steal bulk keys from Gemalto a GSM SIM manufacturer. Assuming that GSM was a sane public key based system… Making SIMs can be like this: have a machine which generates key pairs, writes the private key into the SIM, and the public key to a file along with the…”

By English: Cpl. Lydia M. Davey [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Playing with Open NHS data, and a rant

James Uther wrote “Open Data ™ is being pushed quite heavily by the powers that be, which is mostly a good thing because It’s useful information that I want to use, and I’ve already paid taxes for it. Also, this is a democracy dammit. Can Haz Sunlight!. The NHS is part of this. For most of this post…”

By Killerlimpet (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

What is Simple?

Ian Rogers wrote “Consider these quotes: “Any sufficiently complicated program contains an ad hoc, informally-specified, bug-ridden, slow implementation of half of Common Lisp” – Greenspuns Tenth Rule Of Programming “Once you add group by, filter, & join, you can no longer claim to have invented a new query language, only a new dialect of SQL. With worse syntax…”

Why not program in Standard ML?

David Ireland wrote “I decided to learn a language from the ML family recently, because we are seeing quite a few good candidates whose strongest language is F# or OCAML. So I decided to learn Standard ML. Yes, I know, that makes no sense. But wait… Standard ML is really small and easily learned. If you know another…”

Two weeks at LShift

Lewis wrote “On a welcome break from studying for my GCSEs at school I spent two weeks doing ‘work experience’ at LShift. At the end of the two week placement I was interrogated by Keith Fisher. Here’s a transcript: 1. Did you have a choice in where to do your work experience placement? Yes I had complete…”

Three years on…

Frank Shearar wrote “It’s nearly exactly three years since I started at LShift. I’d like to take a moment and look back at what I’ve done.”